Type I interferon-mediated autoinflammation due to DNase II deficiency.

Rodero MP, Tesser A, Bartok E, Rice GI, Della Mina E, Depp M, Beitz B, Bondet V, Cagnard N, Duffy D, Dussiot M, Frémond ML, Gattorno M, Guillem F, Kitabayashi N, Porcheray F, Rieux-Laucat F, Seabra L, Uggenti C, Volpi S, Zeef LAH, Alyanakian MA, Beltrand J, Bianco AM, Boddaert N, Brouzes C, Candon S, Caorsi R, Charbit M, Fabre M, Faletra F, Girard M, Harroche A, Hartmann E, Lasne D, Marcuzzi A, Neven B, Nitschke P, Pascreau T, Pastore S, Picard C, Picco P, Piscianz E, Polak M, Quartier P, Rabant M, Stocco G, Taddio A, Uettwiller F, Valencic E, Vozzi D, Hartmann G, Barchet W, Hermine O, Bader-Meunier B, Tommasini A, Crow YJ.

Source : Nat Commun

2018 Oct 1

Pmid : 29259162

Abstract

Microbial nucleic acid recognition serves as the major stimulus to an antiviral response, implying a requirement to limit the misrepresentation of self nucleic acids as non-self and the induction of autoinflammation. By systematic screening using a panel of interferon-stimulated genes we identify two siblings and a singleton variably demonstrating severe neonatal anemia, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, liver fibrosis, deforming arthropathy and increased anti-DNA antibodies. In both families we identify biallelic mutations in DNASE2, associated with a loss of DNase II endonuclease activity. We record increased interferon alpha protein levels using digital ELISA, enhanced interferon signaling by RNA-Seq analysis and constitutive upregulation of phosphorylated STAT1 and STAT3 in patient lymphocytes and monocytes. A hematological disease transcriptomic signature and increased numbers of erythroblasts are recorded in patient peripheral blood, suggesting that interferon might have a particular effect on hematopoiesis. These data define a type I interferonopathy due to DNase II deficiency in humans.

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